Welcome

Star Nursery is the complete Garden Center that is independently owned and operated. We cater to both residential and commercial clientele. Currently, we operate in Southern Nevada, Southern Utah and Northern Arizona with a total of 15 Retail Locations and 9 Decorative Rock Distribution Centers.

We offer a complete line of dry goods including irrigation supplies, fertilizers, and an array of gardening accessories and tools.  We carry a large assortment of trees, shrubbery, drought-tolerant plants, succulents, houseplants and more.  We, also have a have a selection of hardscape products ranging from flagstone to pavers to rock. Find everything you need to maintain a beautiful landscape or garden space.

We pride ourselves in giving our customers the right price and the best advice.
Star NurseryYour garden’s partner for every bloomin’ thing since 1983.


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The Color Of Cool

Winter Flower Gardening Options

Plant one. Plant them All
Don’t miss out on the beautiful color this season.
~Julie Johnson

 

Pink Zonal Geranium 

Pelargonium Hortorum

Mix Vintage Stock

Matthiola incana

  Cyclamen  

Cyclamen persicum

Snapdragon 

 Antirrhinum majus

Viola

Johnny Jump Up

 Without a doubt, one of the best things about living in Las Vegas is the mild winter temperatures, which allow us to enjoy colorful flowers throughout the year. When everyone else in the country is stuck inside or shoveling snow, we’re blessed with bright and sunny daytime temperatures that warm the soil enough to keep some annuals and perennials blooming right through the winter months.

If you have a solid half-day of sun or more expect long-lasting blooms from snapdragons or dianthus. Both of these plants get a little taller (about 18” – 24” in height), so place them in the back of a bedding area or in the center of a container to serve as a pretty back-drop for lower growers. For an excellent focal point in your winter garden, add vintage stock. It’s flower is aromatic. It will grow great in well-amended soils or simply in colorful pottery. Place them outside in the sun and fertilize regularly to encourage new blooms.

Calendula offers eye-popping orange and yellow blossoms throughout the winter season. It is the perfect height to place next to your taller plants. It grows to about 12” in height and its velvety gray-green leaves are a nice contrast to its own bright flowers and the darker green foliage of nearby plants. Ornamental cabbage and kale bring sculptural appeal anywhere it is used and looks fantastic planted in a formal setting or mixed in with other seasonal flowers.

Pansies are the most reliable low-growing winter color for an area that receives full sun. It doesn’t matter what theme you’re shooting for in  your garden, because there is a pansy to suit anyone’s fancy. Since they only grow to about 6”-8” tall, pansies are ideal next to a walkway or along the edge of a container.

People often think they can’t grow anything that flowers in the shade. Contrary to popullar belief , there are actually several flowering plants that do well without a lot of sun. Minimal sunlight works fine with any of the following plants, though they can absorb up to half a day without a problem. Take zonal geraniums, in the right light , they’ll bloom nearly year-round and take a break only during the hottest parts of the summer. Then, there is the cherry red, white and pink colored blooms amongst the cyclamen. It is the perfect flower to spruce up your entryway for the holidays. Cyclamen are also one of your best options for an area with no direct sunlight. Violas or english primrose are also an attractive addition to your winter garden.

Pink Zonal Geranium 

Pelargonium Hortorum

Mix Vintage Stock

Matthiola incana

  Cyclamen  

Cyclamen persicum

Snapdragon 

 Antirrhinum majus

Without a doubt, one of the best things about living in Las Vegas is the mild winter temperatures, which allow us to enjoy colorful flowers throughout the year. When everyone else in the country is stuck inside or shoveling snow, we’re blessed with bright and sunny daytime temperatures that warm the soil enough to keep some annuals and perennials blooming right through the winter months.

If you have a solid half-day of sun or more expect long-lasting blooms from snapdragons or dianthus. Both of these plants get a little taller (about 18” – 24” in height), so place them in the back of a bedding area or in the center of a container to serve as a pretty back-drop for lower growers. For an excellent focal point in your winter garden, add vintage stock. It’s flower is aromatic. It will grow great in well-amended soils or simply in colorful pottery. Place them outside in the sun and fertilize regularly to encourage new blooms.

Calendula offers eye-popping orange and yellow blossoms throughout the winter season. It is the perfect height to place next to your taller plants. It grows to about 12” in height and its velvety gray-green leaves are a nice contrast to its own bright flowers and the darker green foliage of nearby plants. Ornamental cabbage and kale bring sculptural appeal anywhere it is used and looks fantastic planted in a formal setting or mixed in with other seasonal flowers.

Pansies are the most reliable low-growing winter color for an area that receives full sun. It doesn’t matter what theme you’re shooting for in  your garden, because there is a pansy to suit anyone’s fancy. Since they only grow to about 6”-8” tall, pansies are ideal next to a walkway or along the edge of a container.

People often think they can’t grow anything that flowers in the shade. Contrary to popullar belief , there are actually several flowering plants that do well without a lot of sun. Minimal sunlight works fine with any of the following plants, though they can absorb up to half a day without a problem. Take zonal geraniums, in the right light , they’ll bloom nearly year-round and take a break only during the hottest parts of the summer. Then, there is the cherry red, white and pink colored blooms amongst the cyclamen. It is the perfect flower to spruce up your entryway for the holidays. Cyclamen are also one of your best options for an area with no direct sunlight. Violas or english primrose are also an attractive addition to your winter garden.

Winterizing Your Landscape


by Brandi Eide

As you bundle up to stay warm this winter, don’t forget about your plants. Some of them benefit from extra protection when the temperatures dip. Look up your city’s average frost dates to know when to expect frost.

If you are uncertain, check species online to determine their winter hardiness. Yards often have different microclimates; plants have some protection when placed under trees and shrubs, patios, and next to homes or walls that heat up during the day.

Shrubs sheared into unnatural shapes or those over-pruned are more susceptible to frost damage. Avoid applying fertilizer later in the year, it encourages tender growth sensitive to frost.

Water leafy plants before a freeze; their hydrated leaves will then better tolerate the ice crystals that form and draw moisture from the leaf tissue. Succulents are just the opposite: keep them drier during cold months, water infrequently or not at all. (There are winter growing succulents, with varying temperature sensitivities, but most landscape succulents in the southwest are summer growers and should remain dry in winter while dormant).

Cover sensitive plants with frost cloth, sheets or any fabric light enough not to crush a plant, or construct a framework around delicate plants with poles, PVC or tomato cages to support a heavier fabric. Frost cloth is a lightweight cloth that can be found in at least 4 different weights which increase temperatures by around 4-10°F if used correctly; it allows a fair amount of light to reach plants, therefore it can be left on for several weeks.  Apply plant coverings like a tent:  draped to the ground and held/staked there. This captures the warmth radiating from the ground and keeps out cool air that sinks to the ground at night. Don’t wrap fabric around shrubs or trees like a lollipop wrapper. While this offers some protection, it is far less effective than tenting. Use supports with plastic sheeting to keep it from touching plant material as it can otherwise cause more damage than good.

Correct Incorrect

Some columnar cactus are tall or too challenging to cover. In this event, place Styrofoam cups over the tips of the stems for protection. In a pinch, use large plant containers, buckets or trash barrels to cover larger succulents overnight.

No matter what solution you use, leave the materials on for a short period of time. You can use fabrics for a few weeks and buckets overnight or a few days.

Frost cloth is a hot commodity right before a freeze. Don’t wait until the weather forecast predicts freezing temperatures to gather necessary supplies. Plan ahead, order supplies from your local nursery or online and be ready for cold evenings. Alternately, know the frost tolerance of the plants you purchase. With careful selection and plant placement for your climate, (consider both winter and summer exposure), you can often avoid the need for winter protection.

If your plants show signs of frost damage, resist the urge to prune until the danger of frost has passed. Dead foliage continues to protect the inner parts of the plant through winter. Some plants die back to the ground entirely, wait until spring to determine which plants need to be replaced and which require a rejuvenation pruning.

For useful information about desert gardening, visit the Springs Preserve Garden in Las Vegas or visit us online at springspreserve.org.

~Photography by Springs Preserve